Home » A Careful and Free Inquiry Into the True Nature and Tendency of the Religious Principles of the Society of Friends, Commonly Called Quakers: In Two Parts by William Craig Brownlee
A Careful and Free Inquiry Into the True Nature and Tendency of the Religious Principles of the Society of Friends, Commonly Called Quakers: In Two Parts William Craig Brownlee

A Careful and Free Inquiry Into the True Nature and Tendency of the Religious Principles of the Society of Friends, Commonly Called Quakers: In Two Parts

William Craig Brownlee

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ISBN : 9781331641834
Paperback
372 pages
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Excerpt from A Careful and Free Inquiry Into the True Nature and Tendency of the Religious Principles of the Society of Friends, Commonly Called Quakers: In Two PartsThe materials of this volume were gleaned from various sources- and during thatMoreExcerpt from A Careful and Free Inquiry Into the True Nature and Tendency of the Religious Principles of the Society of Friends, Commonly Called Quakers: In Two PartsThe materials of this volume were gleaned from various sources- and during that period in which the society of Friends struggled into existence.In that extraordinary period, when death had removed the head of that party which had been flung into power by the whirlwind of faction, the British nation replaced its native prince on the throne of his fathers.But Charles II. was an unprincipled man. He neither feared God, nor regarded man. He was a Jesuit in politics, a Judas in religion, a Nero on the throne. Irreclaimable even by the lessons which the nation had given his family, in the reigns of his father and grandfather- and deplorably and culpably ignorant of the duty and the art of ruling- and in a great degree a stranger to the character and disposition of that high-minded people, over whom he was placed as chief magistrate, he came to the throne with all the errors of a Stuart, if possible, tenfold increased. His reign, under the tutorship of Lauderdale, exhibited little else than misrule, and tyranny and cruelty.The kingdom he claimed as his inheritance by birthright. The treasure, and the bodies, and the consciences of the people he considered as his property- and as much at his disposal as his moveables, or the tenants of his stables. By the act of supremacy of A. D. 1669, procured by the most corrupt influence, he received power over all matters and persons, ecclesiastical and civil. He modelled the form of worship and government in the church according to his will. He denied to the people the right of electing their ministers, or of thinking for themselves, or of taking care of their own souls.About the PublisherForgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.comThis book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully- any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.